Finding Your Photographic Vision #1: Heroes

In light of the massive number of gear reviews and how-tos on YouTube, I felt like making a short vlog focusing on developing a personal vision.  In Part 1, I tell you about some of my own photographic heroes – Sebastio Salgado and Ralph Eugene Meatyard- and how they influenced some of my own work.

Minimal Monochrome Model Instax

I’ve come to the conclusion that instant film is the ideal format for my photography – minimalist, strange, shot with “what you see is what you get” style lighting.  These were shot with Fujifilm Instax Mini Monochrome Film – 10 Exposures on my Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 Neo Classic Instant Film Camera, and here’s a little tutorial from my YouTube on how to get the double exposure effect you see in Shasta’s image!

Instant Film, Creative Damage

Welcome to another of my video series featuring creative things you can do with instant film! In this video I show you a technique for mark making on both Fuji Instax Mini and Impossible Project film alongside a few examples I shot with models Mckenzie Eckels and Kaila Stone.

If you enjoy this instant film video I encourage you to check out the other ones on my channel!

I have a full class on instant film techniques over on my Skillshare channel.

Film used in this video is Impossible Project Polaroid 600 and the Fujifilm Instax Mini!

Working With Titles + Credits In Adobe Premiere Pro – A Skillshare Class

New year, new Skillshare classes up!  “Working With Titles + Credits In Adobe Premiere Pro” is my second new class this year, one of several Adobe Premiere courses I have in the pipeline.

intro-to-titles-1

Adobe Premiere Pro is a powerful video editing tool which also allows you the ability to design titles and credit sequences.  This class is meant for the beginning video editor or filmmaker who wants to create title/ credit sequences and templates.  We’ll also cover some of the design elements that go into an effective placement of text in our videos.

Sign up here!

Double Exposure Instant Film W/ The Fuji Neo Classic

Since my studio opened last month I’ve been able to film more tutorial and gear reviews – I especially enjoy harping on the beloved Fuji Instax Mini film and cameras.  Here’s two recent videos covering different aspects of the analogue style!

Art, Advice + Setting

Earlier this year I saw Cheech Marin talking about his painting collection, how art experts were always saying “painting is a dead art” and he said he would go into museums and galleries and see endless paintings.
 
This was a bit after Photolucida where one taste-making reviewer told me “museums and galleries don’t currently care about images with models or any kind of planned setup in them, they only want real life” and that anyone can shoot fashion without knowing anything about it- then a very established top-tier “planned portrait” photographer told me the exact opposite.
 
Then there are the endless calls to “brand” your work, be an expert at one thing and work that thing into the ground so you’re the “go-to guy” even though it’s likely there are many “go-to guys” and that singular style will get real stale real quick.
 
I think if you’re a creative person any advice to be given or received is very lifestyle-specific to the point that it’s barely worth seeking out. I know a lot of what I make is stuff that can be organized around my kids’ school schedule, and a lot of my ideas come from the things they are interested in that align with what I liked at their age. The idea of spending months away from home working on a film set or shooting nightlife or making a truly violent horror film or documentary on junkies is absurd to my lifestyle, and even if I tried it would be half hearted, but other people can make it work with ease.
 
David Byrne talks about how music is setting-specific in his book Music, like punk rock in a small club vs choral music in a cathedral, booty bass in a jacked out car, etc. and I’m starting all art is setting specific as well, not just the final destination like a gallery or vimeo, but the setting your life is in.

The Art of Pushing Pixels and Waveforms on my Skillshare Channel

It’s been close to a year since I started my Skillshare channel and at the time of this writing I’m offering 17 classes, from Photography to Video Editing to Sound Mixing to Ceramics to Illustration.  It seems like a variety of things but to me it’s all art, mostly involving pixels and waveforms.  When you’ve been doing stuff for a long time, you pick up a number of useful skills, and that’s the overall premise of Skillshare.

The Skillshare site itself encourages people to create bite-sized, project oriented classes that are complete in themselves, which is understandable- I myself check the run time of a class, and if it’s over 45 minutes, no matter how interested I am in the topic, I’ll probably skip it.

I was able to get 5 tutorials up in September, and my goal for the rest of the year is to continue with 1 new class a week.  Some classes have been very broad and beginner-level, others- like my Motion Comics series or Design A Character Based On An Ancient Culture– have been very targeted and based on personal projects I’ve been working on.

At this point I want to ask anyone out there:  what would you like to see a tutorial on?  Basic stuff, m0re photography, more video, sound editing, process videos of someone creating a piece of art?  Let me know in the comments below!