New Photoworks On Etsy

I’ve added a lot of new prints to the Etsy shop, as well as new one-of-a-kind instax and ceramic masks.  These particular images are all available as 8×12″ archival prints ranging from $25-$30.  The top three painted images were collaborations with artist Jamie Graden in Los Angeles…

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…and these two were painted by model and artist Luxbot Lacheln, who is in the first image…

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If you enjoy any of this work I encourage you to like and share it!  For more photoworks goodness peruse my Etsy shop, follow on tumblr and twitter and instagram, and rummage around on my full site.

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Sierra in Seattle

This is a compilation of sorts, video + photos + interview audio + music audio I’ve all done with Seattle model Sierra McKenzie.  If you enjoy any of this work I encourage you to like and share it!  For more photoworks goodness peruse my Etsy shop, follow on tumblr and twitter and instagram, and rummage around on my full site.

Photoworks Trailer

Youtube encourages people to have a short trailer on their channel, so here’s the one I made for mine!  The music is borrowed from my 2015 music project.

If you’re a kind of person who likes subscribing to channels- or like the kind of work that I show on my tumblr- I encourage you to like/ subscribe/ share anything! Independent arts can’t exist without your support!

Thoughts on Photography School

I earned my BFA in Photography from ASU in 2006 and have only been asked for it a few times, mostly related to teaching rather than as an evaluation of my shooting skills.  It cost $20,000 + interest and it’s only that low because I did 2 years of community college beforehand.  I’ve heard ASU tuition has nearly doubled in the 8 years I’ve been out of it.  I don’t know of anyone else from my ASU classes who continued photography or exhibits it, except for one guy who teaches at a local community college.

In the years since my graduation, my style and depth of knowledge has almost nothing to do with what I learned in college.  We were working mostly in darkrooms using paper that cost $1 a sheet for prints that aren’t in my portfolio at all, with teachers who were active in the arts scene but didn’t really have any sort of modern outlook on things.  Also there was absolutely no “how to survive as a freelancer or artist” component to any of the classes.  The real education and growth for me has been in the doing, and occasionally through free online tutorials, podcasts with actual working artists and photographers, workshops, and through teaching others.

In the local community workshops I teach, I get asked by students about going to photography school.

Anyone can learn photography and improve existing skills if they have the drive and curiosity without spending $20,000.

You’ll need knowledgeable people who can give you honest feedback.  And you’ll need to be honest with yourself.

You’ll need basic gear.

You’ll need time to go out and make the kinds of images that interest you (you don’t even get this when you are in higher education because you have actual schoolwork to do).

And whether you take photo classes or DIY, you’ll need years of practice, experimentation, failing, dead end projects, going to relevant trade and art events and meeting other people.  Those things may cost a lot of money as well- a 4-day workshop in Palm Springs with a well-known photographer mentor runs $1000- that’s a drop in the bucket compared to college for the arts.

“But you have the ear of your college instructor for months!  Maybe a lifetime as an alumni!”  True, you and hundreds of other students.  A workshop gives individualized instruction to a small amount of people.

“But you have to get a degree to get any decent paying job!”  Also true, but not a photography degree!  Try engineering, software development, business… marketable skills that the “real world” values.  The creative arts are not valued in such a way.  Just ask anyone in a band, any comedian or model how much they make or how often they are undervalued for their talents.

“But I’m not that self-motivated… I need a teacher to tell me what direction to go in.”  Then you’re not going to be creating very much.

If you enjoy any of this work I encourage you to like it and share it!  For more photoworks goodness peruse my Etsy shop, follow on tumblr and twitter and instagram, and rummage around on my full site.

 

 

 

 

 

Fuji X-T1 Test with Magdalena

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It’s been close to a year since I jumped ship from Nikon to Fuji, and my starter X-E1 already felt a bit long in the tooth compared to the more rugged X-T1 that was released this year.  In October I was able to upgrade and my first shoots with new cameras always seem to prominently feature my daughter Magdalena.  Long story short- I love the camera.  It’s clearly a bit tougher than the plastic X-E1, and I’m more on board with a few small adaptaions:

1. dedicated ISO dial

2. dedicated video button

3. ability to set the function on all directional buttons- in my case, focus points in each direction

Anything that stops me from searching through a menu is a plus in my book.  The only downside, so far, is that the Fuji app that supposedly connects via wi-fi is broken since the release of ios8, but that’s an app problem, not a hardware one.

This was also in combination with various small pieces of equipment, like Neewer LED lights and a smoke machine (not pictured here).  If you enjoy any of this work I encourage you to like it and share it!  For more photoworks goodness peruse my Etsy shop, follow on tumblr and twitter and instagram, and rummage around on my full site.

Double Exposure Instax w Sierra (NSFW)

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I am absolutely in love with making double exposure instax mini images.  The Fuji Neo Classic is, to my knowledge, the only instant film camera with that capability.  Part of the fun is figuring out how to be more creative with each shot made. sierra instax002

Traditionally, a double exposure works best as one shot of subject, one shot of texture, but in these images w model Sierra McKenzie, we tried a variety of layering concepts.  Turn the camera upside down for one image.  Have the model pose the same but against a different background.  Model is both near and far, like the great Grover said.   All this with the benefit of having a small, one-of-a-kind collectible item to sell on Etsy.

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If you enjoy any of this work I encourage you to like it and share it!  For more photoworks goodness peruse my Etsy shop, follow on tumblr and twitter and instagram, and rummage around on my full site.